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Total (Solar) Eclipse of the Heart

Posted 5 months ago by Heather H

Posted in Children & Parenting, Education, Fitness, Nature, & Travel, Programs, Resources and Science, Medicine, & Technology | Tagged with astronomy, eclipses, great american eclipse, ritter planetarium, solar eclipse and solar eclipse safety

UPDATE: All TLCPL locations are currently out of the solar eclipse viewing glasses.

I’m clearly dating myself here with this blog title (let’s revisit Bonnie Tyler’s hit song from the 1980’s), but listening to the lyrics while pretending they’re sung to total solar eclipses is pretty funny.

Turn around, every now and then I get a little bit lonely and you’re never coming round…”

And accurate as well, seeing as how the last time we were able to see this much of a total solar eclipse over Toledo, Ohio would have been either May 10, 1994 (this was an annular solar eclipse, so a bit different) or on June 30, 1954 according to this cool searchable calendar.

So let’s talk about what we are going to see. In my research, I found a number of different predictions, but all seem to point to us seeing a near total solar eclipse – approximately 80%. In other words, what we can hope to see might appear to look something like this given the right weather forecast:

To help you learn how to safely view the solar eclipse, we’re partnering with The University of Toledo’s Ritter Planetarium to provide attendees with "Solar Survival Kits" which include a pair of solar eclipse glasses and a family four-pack of tickets to the planetarium.

Solar Eclipse Safety Workshops:

July 19 – 2 p.m. - Lagrange Branch
July 24 – 2 p.m. – Locke Branch
July 27 – 3 p.m. – Kent Branch
July 28 – 10 a.m. - Heatherdowns Branch
July 29 – 2 p.m. – Sanger Branch
August 1 – 2 p.m. – Main, Children’s Library
August 3 – 2 p.m. – Reynolds Corners Branch
August 8 – 2 p.m. – West Toledo Branch
August 16 – 3 p.m. – Toledo Heights Branch
August 18 – 4 p.m. – Birmingham Branch

We also have a few additional fun astronomy themed programs at our new King Road Branch, to keep you in the “Great American Eclipse” spirit!

Amazing Astronomy - August 10, 2 p.m.
Astronomy 101 - August 10, 7 p.m.
Glimpse the Eclipse - August 21, Library Hours

And don’t forget to check out The University of Toledo’s public programs in August.

Eclipse 2017 Preview Show

Fridays, August 4th through the 18th at 8:30 p.m.

Ritter Planetarium and Brooks Observatory This live and interactive program will prepare you for the All-American Eclipse on August 21st of this year. Learn what eclipses are and why they happen. You will get all the information you need to safely watch this eclipse from your own backyard. Don’t miss this rare event!

Looking to learn more about our sun, moon, and/or solar eclipses on your own time? Check out these recommended reads:

Books for Adults & Teens:

American eclipse : a nation's epic race to catch the shadow of the moon and win the glory of the world / David BaronAmerican Eclipse: A Nation’s Epic Race to Catch the Shadow of the Moon & Win the Glory of the World by David Baron

Documents the efforts of three scientists to observe the rare total solar eclipse of 1878, citing how the ambitions of James Craig Watson, Maria Mitchell, and Thomas Edison helped America's early pursuits as a scientific superpower.

Eclipses / Nick Hunter Eclipses by Nick Hunter

This book looks at solar and lunar eclipses, providing background information about the Sun, the Moon, and our planet. It also covers what an eclipse is, what eclipses can look like, how they happen, the effects on wildlife, what people thought of eclipses in the past, how they are studied today, and about eclipses on other planets. A fun activity is provided along with advice on viewing eclipses. Beautiful photographs and simple text help to engage readers and aid their understanding.
Sun, moon, Earth : the history of solar eclipses from omens of doom to Einstein and exoplanets / Tyler Nordgren Sun, Moon, Earth: The History of Solar Eclipses from Omens of Doom to Einstein and Exoplanets by Tyler Nordgren

Ahead of the first total eclipse of the sun in 40 years, which will take place on August 21, 2017, an astronomer describes how solar eclipses were treated and interpreted by past civilizations, philosophers and Victorian scientists.

Books for Kids:

Exploring our sun : [Dr. Mae Jemison and the 100 Year Starship] / Mae Jemison and Dana Meachen Rau Exploring Our Sun by Mae Jemison & Dana Meachen Rau

The sun provides us with the light and energy we need to survive. It also serves as the center of our solar system, with its gravitational pull keeping the planets in orbit. But what exactly is the sun? This title explores how the sun was formed, what it is made of, and how its energy travels to Earth and the other planets of the solar system.
Our solar system / Seymour SimonOur Solar System by Seymour Simon

Takes readers on an interplanetary tour from the sun to the ever-mysterious Mars, and then, thanks to the Voyager missions, to the planets beyond.
The science behind wonders of the sun : sun dogs, lunar eclipses, and green flash / by Suzanne Garbe; Consultant: Dr. Karen Schwarz The Science Behind Wonders of the Sun: Sun Dogs, Lunar Eclipses, & Green Flash by Suzanne Garbe

The Sun gives life to our planet, but it also produces some amazing phenomena. From sun dogs and green flash to solar flares and sunspots, The Science Behind Wonders of the Sun looks at some of these phenomena, explaining how and why they occur.

Learn more about the “Great American Eclipse” online:

The University of Toledo's Ritter Planetarium Solar Eclipse Programs

Total Solar Eclipse 2017: When, Where and How to See It (Safely) - Space.com

Total Solar Eclipse of August 21, 2017 - GreatAmericanEclipse.com

Total Solar Eclipse 2017 - Eclipse2017.org 

Eclipses visible in Toledo, Ohio - TimeandDate.com

Eclipse Page - NASA

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