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Is There a Doctor in the House? Fascinating Tales of Medicine

Posted 7 months ago by Amy H

My mother always wanted me to be a nurse. But considering the fact that I had to stop uploading a picture of some red blood cells for this post because I started to feel woozy and faint, it's probably for the best that I didn't follow that path. However, I can appreciate the many excellent narratives on medical breakthroughs. Partake one or more of these each day before bed.

Explore the Fascinating History of Medicine, Science and Psychology

Books Available @ Your Library

Under the Knife: a History of Surgery in 28 Remarkable Operations by Arnold Van De Laar

Under the Knife: a History of Surgery in 28 Remarkable Operations by Arnold Van De Laar

Surgeon Arnold van de Laar uses his own experience and expertise to tell this engrossing history of surgery through 28 famous operations—from Louis XIV and Einstein to JFK and Houdini. What happens during an operation? How does the human body respond to being attacked by a knife, a bacterium, a cancer cell or a bullet? And, as medical advances continuously push the boundaries of what medicine can cure, what are the limits of surgery? With stories spanning the dark centuries of bloodletting and amputations without anesthetic through today's sterile, high-tech operating rooms, "Under the Knife" is both a rich cultural history, and a modern anatomy class for us all.

The Personality Brokers: The Strange History of Myers-Briggs and the Birth of Personality Testing by Merve Emre

The Personality Brokers: The Strange History of Myers-Briggs and the Birth of Personality Testing by Merve Emre

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is the most popular personality test in the world. Its language of personality types--extraversion and introversion, sensing and intuiting, thinking and feeling, judging and perceiving--has inspired television shows, online dating platforms, and countless Buzzfeed quizzes. Yet despite the test's widespread adoption, experts in the field of psychometric testing, a $2 billion industry, have struggled to validate its results--much less account for its success. How did Myers-Briggs, a homegrown multiple-choice questionnaire, infiltrate our workplaces, our relationships, our Internet, our lives?

Nine Pints: A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood by Rose George

Nine Pints: A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood by Rose George

Blood carries life, yet the sight of it makes people faint. It is a waste product and a commodity pricier than oil. It can save lives and transmit deadly infections. Each one of us has roughly nine pints of it, yet many don’t even know their own blood type. Author Rose George takes us from ancient practices of bloodletting to modern “hemovigilance” teams that track blood-borne diseases. She probes the lucrative business of plasma transfusions, in which the U.S. is known as the “OPEC of plasma.” And she looks to the future, as researchers seek to bring synthetic blood to a hospital near you. Spanning science and politics, stories and global epidemics, "Nine Pints" reveals our life's blood in an entirely new light.

Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of neurology by Suzanne O’Sullivan

Brainstorm: Detective Stories from the World of neurology by Suzanne O’Sullivan

"Brainstorm" follows the stories of people whose medical diagnoses are so strange even their doctor struggles to know how to solve them. A man who sees cartoon characters running across the room; a girl whose world suddenly seems completely distorted, as though she were Alice in Wonderland; another who transforms into a ragdoll whenever she even thinks about moving. The brain is the most complex structure in the universe. Neurologists must puzzle out life-changing diagnoses from the tiniest of clues, the ultimate medical detective work. In this riveting book, Suzanne O'Sullivan tracks the clues of her patients' symptoms. It's a journey that will open your eyes to the unfathomable intricacies of our brains and the infinite variety of human experience.

The Strange Case of Dr. Couney: How a Mysterious European Showman Saved Thousands of American Babies by Dawn Raffle

The Strange Case of Dr. Couney: How a Mysterious European Showman Saved Thousands of American Babies by Dawn Raffle

Raffel artfully recounts the extraordinary tale of how a mysterious immigrant "doctor" became the revolutionary innovator of saving premature babies--by placing them in incubators in World's Fair side shows and on Coney Island and Atlantic City. Dr. Couney figured out he could use incubators and careful nursing to keep previously doomed infants alive, and at the same time make good money displaying these tiny babies alongside sword swallowers, bearded ladies, and burlesque shows.

How this turn-of-the-twentieth-century émigré became the savior to families with premature infants, known then as "weaklings"--while ignoring the scorn of the medical establishment and fighting the climate of eugenics--is one of the most astounding stories of modern medicine. And as readers will find, Dr. Couney, for all his opportunistic entrepreneurial gusto, is a surprisingly appealing character, someone who genuinely cared for the well-being of his tiny patients, but who nonetheless had something to hide.

Mystery of the Exploding Teeth: and other curiosities from the History of Medicine by Thomas Morris

Mystery of the Exploding Teeth: and other curiosities from the History of Medicine by Thomas Morris

Medical historian Thomas Morris delivers one of the most remarkable, cringe-inducing collections of stories ever assembled, which reveal a great deal about the evolution of modern medicine. Some show the medical profession hopeless in the face of ailments that today would be quickly banished by modern drugs; but others are heartening tales of recovery against the odds, patients saved from death by the devotion or ingenuity of a conscientious doctor. However embarrassing the ailment or ludicrous the treatment, every case in "The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth" tells us something about the knowledge (and ignorance) of an earlier age, along with the sheer resilience of human life.

The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century by Deborah Blum

The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century by Deborah Blum

By the end of nineteenth century, food was dangerous. Lethal, even. "Milk" might contain formaldehyde. Decaying meat was preserved with borax, a popular cleaning product. This was not by accident; food manufacturers had rushed to embrace the rise of industrial chemistry, and were knowingly selling harmful products. In 1883, Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley was named chief chemist of the agriculture department, and the agency began methodically investigating food and drink fraud.

Over the next thirty years, a titanic struggle took place, with Dr. Wiley campaigning indefatigably for food safety and consumer protection. Pulitzer prize-winning author Blum brings to life this timeless "David and Goliath" tale with righteous verve and style, driving home the moral imperative of confronting corporate greed and government corruption with a bracing clarity, which speaks resoundingly to the enormous social and political challenges we face today.

She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity by Carl Zimmer

She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity by Carl Zimmer

Award-winning New York Times science writer Carl Zimmer presents a profoundly original perspective on what we pass along from generation to generation. The birth of genetics in the early 1900s allowed us to translate old notions about heredity into a language of genes. But heredity isn’t just about genes that pass from parent to child. Heredity continues within our own bodies, as a single cell gives rise to trillions of other cells. We say we inherit genes from our ancestors but we inherit other things from a variety of sources that matter as much or more to our lives, from microbes in our immediate environments to the effects of technologies we use to make life more comfortable. We need a new definition of what heredity is and, through Carl Zimmer’s lucid exposition and storytelling, this resounding tour de force delivers it.

Give 3 Get 3

What's Give 3 Get 3 you ask? It's a personalized reading/listening/viewing recommendation service provided by the Toledo Lucas County Public Library. Basically, librarians provide customers with reading, listening and/or viewing suggestions based on a short questionnaire. Tell us about 3 titles you enjoyed recently (and why) and we'll send you back 3 more recommendations based on your responses.

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