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Writer's Block

Posted about 1 month ago by Brendan D

Posted in Arts, Crafts, & Hobbies and Fiction, Literature, Poetry & Graphic Novels | Tagged with authorship, authorship, composition, creative writing, Fiction - Technique, writer's block and writing

Creativity or creative inspiration may hit all at once or not at all for some writers. Those moments of nothingness are annoying, because they bring all creative projects to a halt, especially when they're for school or cover topics that aren't all that interesting. Writer’s block is one of the biggest problems that writers run into, both amateur and professional.

The library is a writer's best resource, because there's something for every type of writer. Poets - check out Writing Poetry from the Inside Out by Sandford Lyne if you’re looking for proper formations. If you’re interested in writing a memoir or an autobiography, try Write Your Life Story by Michael Oke. Struggling with ideas? Look into the Story Starter online for randomly generated writing prompts or even Fred D. White’s Where do you get your ideas? to find a concept and bring it to fruition. Just Write by James Scott Bell is another good one for fiction writers. And Writer’s Digest is a great website and magazine that's highly recommended for general advice from experienced authors. Finally, don't forget about the mechanics (i.e., grammar and citations). If you would like to become a grammar guru, definitely search for the Owl online for writing those pesky, exhausting college papers or William Strunk’s The Elements of Style.

Mess of Typewriter Ribbon - flickr
Photo by Julie Rybarczyk (flickr, some rights reserved).

While people may offer pseudointellectual advice on the subject - the best thing to do is tell yourself writer's block doesn't exist - it's a mental construct. It’s difficult to avoid criticizing your own work, often hating it immediately after it's written. However, if you just write whatever comes to mind, you'll give yourself ideas to branch out from. For example, go outside when you feel like all of your creativity has dried up. Note every single thing that nature provides - like the birds flying overhead or the specific tangerine shade of the sky. Write everything and anything you see, think, and hear. Don’t pay attention to whether or not people will like what you write, just write what you would want to read. Try using the resources available to you, and remember, keep on writing, no matter what.

Books on Writing

The Elements of style / by William Strunk Jr. ; with revisions, an introduction, and a chapter on writing by E.B. White ; [foreword by Roger Angell]
Write your life story : how to organize and record your memories for family and friends to enjoy / Michael Oke
Around the writer's block : using brain science to solve writer's resistance / Rosanne Bane
Where do you get your ideas? : a writer's guide to transforming notions into narratives / Fred White
Just write : creating unforgettable fiction and a rewarding writing life / James Scott Bell
Writing poetry from the inside out : finding your voice through the craft of poetry / Sandford Lyne

Web Resources

The Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL)

The Story Starter

Writer's Digest

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