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Great Comics to Get You Through Staying at Home - All Available on hoopla

Posted 6 months ago by Franco V

They can be a quick, soothing read with plenty of escapism and fun to be had for all ages. Here are some of the best available digitally on hoopla.

Kids

New Kid by Jerry Craft

Jerry Craft's Newbery Medal winning New Kid is a near perfect middle grade graphic novel that practically any person age 8-12 will love, especially if they've been the "new kid" in school. There are important lessons in this book that will hit home with young people, such as those dealing with race, bullying and friendship.

Diana: Princess of the Amazons by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale; illustrated by Victoria Ying

We could all use a dose of hope during these uncertain times, and kids are no exception. For an uplifting and determined heroine, look no further than Wonder Woman herself, Diana of Themyscira. This graphic novel covers a portion of Diana’s childhood where she’s lonely and isolated among all the other Amazons since she’s the only kid around. When Diana finds a way to get another friend her own age things don’t go quite as planned.

El Deafo by Cece Bell

In this graphic memoir, author Cece Bell documents her own hearing loss and experience with using a hearing aid. The book is funny and important, and will make readers realize that sometimes what’s considered a disability is really a superpower.

Teens

The Immortal Hulk by Al Ewing; illustrated by Joe Bennett, Ruy Jose, Paul Mounts, Leonardo Romero, Lee Garbett, and Alex Ross

One part superhero book and another part horror, there’s nothing quite like The Immortal Hulk in comics right now. We all know Hulk. He’s mild-mannered Bruce Banner, but get him angry and, well, you know what happens. Immortal adds an additional twist in the fact that Hulk can’t quite...die. This is a fun, romping read that is sure to distract you from the goings on of the real world.

The Oracle Code by Marieke Nijkamp; illustrated by Manuel Preitano

Barbara Gordon is shot and paralyzed from the waist down and she must undergo intense rehabilitation. But something isn’t quite right at the rehab facility she’s in when patients start to go missing. Utilizing keen intuition and detective skills, The Oracle Code shows that people with disabilities don’t need to “fixed.”

Giant Days by John Allison; illustrated by Max Sarin

Friends Susan, Esther and Daisy are off to college and ready to reinvent themselves. Teens getting ready to depart for college themselves, or have since returned home due to our global circumstance, will feel at home. When confronted with despair the characters of Giant Days find hope.

Adults

My Favorite Thing is Monsters, Vol. 1 by Emil Ferris

There are so many amazing things about My Favorite Thing is Monsters, such as how Emil Ferris had to relearn to draw after contracting West Nile virus and becoming temporarily paralyzed, and that the whole book is drawn with Bic pens. Told through brilliant sketches on wide-ruled journal paper, Monsters follows 10-year-old Karen Reyes through her love of B-movie monsters and solving a mystery that dates back to the Holocaust.

Blacksad by Juan Diaz Canales; illustrated by Juanjo Guardino

Blacksad is near comics perfection. Set in a 1950s noir-ish America, John Blacksad is a private eye (and also a cat), solving murders, abductions and more. The stories are laced with racial tension and the Red Scare, adding a sense of grit and realism to the otherwise fantastic elements.

Lone Wolf and Cub by Kazuo Koike; illustrated by Goseki Kojima

Did you enjoy watching The Mandalorian? Do you have a lot of time on your hands? Lone Wolf and Cub is the manga series for you! Coming in at 28 volumes and thousands of pages, this is a comics masterpiece that is a must read. Without revealing much about the plot, you’ll see some obvious inspiration that The Mandalorian lifted right from the panels and pages.

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